•  Jean-Monnet Centre of Excellence
  • Summer School on the European Decision-Making Process
  • Advanced Master evening programme in Social Sciences & Politics or Economics
  • EU Elections - Free EU Module
  • postgraduate certificate
  • EU-Modules
  • PILC Programme

News from the IES

On 25 September 2013, IES Assistant Director Alexander Mattelaer and Senior Associate Researcher Joachim Koops, briefed the European Parliament’s Subcommittee on Security and Defence at a public hearing on “EU support to United Nations and African Union peacekeeping operations”.

The International Centre for Migration Policy Development (ICMPD), in association with the Institute for European Studies (IES), is proud to present a new lecture series on Migration in the Mediterranean. The series provides an opportunity for reflection on specific issues of recent concerns to Europe, North Africa and the Middle East, from mobility to urbanisation, to policing activities and humanitarian concerns in and around the Mediterranean region.

The SOURCE project, of which the IES is a partner, “Virtual centre of excellence for research support and coordination on societal security" held its kick-off meeting in Brussels on 28 January 2014 thereby officially launching the five-year project funded by the EU FP7 programme.

The IES and the Egmont Institute are proud to present a new collection of essays on the 19-20 December 2013 European Council on defence, edited by Sven Biscop and Daniel Fiott and including contributions from IES senior researchers Alexander Mattelaer and Luis Simón.

In December 2013 the European Council addressed, in the words of its President Herman Van Rompuy, the state of defence in Europe. The Institute for European Studies and Egmont Institute are contributing to this debate with a collection of short and sharp essays that outline the necessity and urgency of acting while offering concrete and ambitious yet feasible recommendations. The collection of essays was presented at a public debate.

EU Economic law in a Time of Crisis

The objective of the IES 2013 Autumn Lecture Series is to analyze the interplay between the law, the economy and the politics, and to focus the discussion on a time of crisis. The lectures will provide insights on the interactions by cutting across key areas of EU economic law; measures to tighten financial regulation and budgetary control, potential flexibilities in the fields of state aid and anti-trust law, and legislative packages to further develop the internal market, for example. A vast number of activities in law have occurred lately, during the crisis. Considering that the success in solving the crisis has been quite moderate so far, however, is economic law proving to be an insufficient tool? Does it only replicate, or even duplicate, the root causes of the crisis, including national protectionism and structural inflexibilities. Can it sufficiently reconcile the non-economic, social aspects of the crisis?

It is crunch-time for European defence establishments. Faced with a rapidly changing world and budgetary constraints, military planners must find innovative solutions to prepare for the future. Anticipating the strategic choices ahead, the Royal Netherlands Air Force commissioned a HCSS study entitled Taking the High Ground – Airpower in the Netherlands: a vision of the future 2015-2025.

In recent months, the migratory impacts of environmental degradation and climate change have gained increased worldwide attention. In response to the publication of the EC Staff Working Document on Climate Change, Environmental Degradation and Migration, this policy brief critically outlines current themes and issues that surround this global phenomenon, specifically the findings of current international research which frame the discussions on terminology and current legal, political and institutional conceptual debates.

The transposition of the Racial Equality Directive (2000/43/EC) has immensely enhanced legal protection against discrimination on the grounds of racial and ethnic origin throughout the EU. More than 10 years after its adoption, the main challenge identified in many Member States is the enforcement of anti-discrimination laws in practice, in particular with regard to access to justice. Ultimately it is up to the domestic courts to ensure effective implementation of anti-discrimination law.

The IES is proud to present a new book co-edited by IES' Academic Director, Sebastian Oberthür:

Sebastian Oberthür and G. Kristin Rosendal (eds.), Global Governance of Genetic Resources: Access and Benefit Sharing after the Nagoya Protocol, Abingdon: Routledge 2014.

This book analyses the status and prospects of the global governance of Access Benefit Sharing (ABS) in the aftermath of 2010’s Nagoya Protocol to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). The CBD’s initial 1992 framework of global ABS governance established the objective of sharing the benefits arising from the use of genetic resources fairly between countries and communities. Since then, ABS has been a contested issue in international politics – not least due to the failure of effective implementation of the original CBD framework. The Nagoya Protocol therefore aims to improve and enhance this framework. Compared to the slow rate of progress on climate change, it has...

New book on European Crisis Response Operations

How do European armed forces generate the desired political effects in containing crises? In his new book, The Politico-Military Dynamics of European Crisis Response Operations, Alexander Mattelaer argues that modern operations rely on a strategic template based on deterrence and capacity-building. The book appeared in the new "European Union in International Affairs" series published by Palgrave Macmillan and institutionally supported by the IES.

IES in the media...

Alexander Mattelaer
8 Apr 2014
Luis Simon
3 Apr 2014
Esther Marijnen
2 Apr 2014
Alexander Mattelaer
31 Mar 2014

EU Performance in the International Climate Negotiations in 2013: Scope for Improvement

The European Union (EU) has long been an important player and even a leader in the international cooperation on climate change. In 2013, preparations for a new global climate agreement in 2015 moved centre stage in the international negotiations. This policy brief assesses the EU’s performance in 2013 culminating in the Warsaw conference in November 2013. We find that the EU was actively engaged in the negotiations and pursued partially ambitious/progressive policy objectives, which it was partly successful in realising.

New Collection of Essays on European Defence

The IES and the Egmont Institute are proud to present a new collection of essays on the 19-20 December 2013 European Council on defence, edited by Sven Biscop and Daniel Fiott and including contributions from IES senior researchers Alexander Mattelaer and Luis Simón.

In December 2013 the European Council addressed, in the words of its President Herman Van Rompuy, the state of defence in Europe. The Institute for European Studies and Egmont Institute are contributing to this debate with a collection of short and sharp essays that outline the necessity and urgency of acting while offering concrete and ambitious yet feasible recommendations. The collection of essays was presented at a public debate.

The ICC and its Deteriorating Relationship with Africa in Light of the Kenya Cases: What Should the EU Position be?

The African Union (AU), a union consisting of 54 African States, held an Extraordinary Summit on 11-12 October 2013, to discuss its relationship with the International Criminal Court (ICC or the Court). The meeting took place just weeks before the trial of Kenya’s President Uhuru Kenyatta is scheduled to begin, and was clearly intended to voice discontent and put on hold the ongoing ICC proceedings against Kenyatta as well as his deputy, Vice-President William Ruto.

New Book on Global Governance of Genetic Resources

The IES is proud to present a new book co-edited by IES' Academic Director, Sebastian Oberthür:

Sebastian Oberthür and G. Kristin Rosendal (eds.), Global Governance of Genetic Resources: Access and Benefit Sharing after the Nagoya Protocol, Abingdon: Routledge 2014.

This book analyses the status and prospects of the global governance of Access Benefit Sharing (ABS) in the aftermath of 2010’s Nagoya Protocol to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). The CBD’s initial 1992 framework of global ABS governance established the objective of sharing the benefits arising from the use of genetic resources fairly between countries and communities. Since then, ABS has been a contested issue in international politics – not least due to the failure of effective implementation of the original CBD framework. The Nagoya Protocol therefore aims to improve and enhance this framework. Compared to the slow rate of progress on climate change, it has been considered a major achievement of global environmental governance, but it has also been coined a ‘masterpiece of ambiguity’. This book analyses the role of a variety of actors in the emergence of the Nagoya Protocol and provides an up-to-date assessment of the core features of the architecture of global ABS governance.

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