Research Network on “Fragmentation and Complexity in Global Governance” (FCGG)

The aim of the FCGG research network is to foster international scientific exchanges and dialogues on regime complexes and institutional fragmentation. Due the growing proliferation of international institutions and regimes, many issues in world politics today fall under the authority of multiple institutions, both private and public. Such a composite galaxy of international institutions and regimes that are valid or active in a particular area has been dubbed a ‘regime complex’. Regime complexes have attracted the attention of a growing number of scholars of world politics as they beg important theoretical questions pertaining to their origins, consequences, and management. The aim of the research network is to sustain and expand inter-disciplinary research into regime complexes.

The network consists of 10 partners:

  • Ghent Institute for International Studies, Ghent University (coordinating institution; project lead: Assistant Professor Thijs Van de Graaf)
  • Institute for European Studies, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (project lead: Professor Sebastian Oberthür)
  • Antwerp Centre for Institutions and Multilevel Politics, Antwerp University (project lead: Professor Dirk De Bièvre)
  • Center for Research in Political Science, Université Saint-Louis – Bruxelles (project lead: Professor Amandine Orsini)
  • Canada Research Chair in IPE, Université Laval (project lead, Professor Jean-Fréderic Morin)
  • Environmental Politics Research Group, Lund University (project lead, Associate Professor Fariborz Zelli)
  • Chair of International Relations, University of Bamberg (project lead, Professor Thomas Gehring)
  • Institute for International Law and the Humanities, Melbourne University (project lead, Associate Professor Margaret Young).
  • Stockholm Environment Institute, Oxford (project lead, Dr. Harro van Asselt)
  • Global Governance Research Unit, WZB Berlin Social Science Center (project lead, Dr. Benjamin Faude)
  • The project will run for five years (2015-2019) and is funded by the Research Foundation – Flanders (FWO).